Rodrigo Moya, the photojournalist who portrayed Che Guevara and Gabriel García Márquez

Thursday, February 13 12.07 GMT


Rodrigo Moya, the photojournalist who portrayed Che Guevara and Gabriel García Márquez


Rodrigo Moya is a photojournalist whose images have incalculable documentary and historical value.

His shots are critical and sensitive, they capture reality, a reality in which you can not lie or retouch.

He captured the social and economic inequality impeccably, rural and urban areas full of latent emotions.

Life and work of Moya

Born in Medellin Colombia however, he would soon travel and reside in Mexico, where he studied engineering at the National Autonomous University.

Just as he received his first photography knowledge with Guillermo Angulo.

He was a graphic reporter from 1955 to 1967 and in his career he has hundreds of stories.

For 1968 he founded the specialized magazine Fishing Technique, which he directed and edited monthly for about twenty-two years.

He participated in the weekly Impact, Events, Politics or the newspaper The day

His shocking stories go from a series of it Che Guevara in 1964 whom he remembers as a kind man.

Another fundamental figure in his path was Gabriel García Márquez whom he captured in 1966 for the next release of his book, One hundred years of loneliness.

His contemporary vision made him one of the most relevant pioneers and exponents of the photography Mexican internationally.

He has also explored poetry and narrative. He currently lives in Cuernavaca.

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